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2018 Voter Guide

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COUNTY OFFICES
Commissioner, District 3

• Tina Francone, Republican, who was appointed to the seat earlier this year by a GOP vacancy committee after Don Rosier stepped down early.
• Lesley Dahlkemper, Democrat, who previously served on the Jeffco school board and was a journalist for several years.
— The Board of County Commissioners is Jeffco’s governing body and consists of three commissioners elected to at-large roles in four-year staggered terms. The county commissioners are responsible for setting policy that guides county programs, the property tax rate and the adoption of the budget.

Clerk & Recorder

• Faye Griffin, Republican, incumbent
• George Stern, Democrat
— The clerk and recorder conducts elections, titles and registers vehicles for county residents, issues marriage licenses, records public records, serves as a clerk to the Board of County Commissioners, and more. Candidates are elected to four-year terms.

Assessor
• Brian Cassidy, Republican
• Scot Kersgaard, Democrat
— The county assessor is responsible for identifying, describing and valuing all property in the county, as well as implementing mill levies to the taxable assessed valuation of property. They are running to replace incumbent Ron Sandstrom, who has occupied the role since 2015.
NOTE: Jeffco Sheriff Jeff Shrader is running unopposed.

STATE OFFICES
Governor/Lieutenant Governor

• State Treasurer Walker Stapleton, a Republican whose running mate is state Rep. Lang Sias, was first elected to office in Colorado in 2010 as state treasurer.
• U.S. Rep. Jared Polis is a Democrat whose running mate is former state Rep. Dianne Primavera, has represented Colorado’s 2nd Congressional District since 2009 and was previously a member of the state board of education from 2001-07.
• Paul Noel Fiorino, Independent
• Bill Hammons, Unity Party of America
• Scott Helker, Libertarian

Senate District 16
• Tim Neville, Republican, incumbent
• Tammy Story, Democrat
• James Gilman, Libertarian
— State senators are members of the Colorado Senate and serve in upper house of the Colorado General Assembly alongside members of Colorado’s House of Representatives.

Senate District 20
• Jessie Danielson, Democrat
• Christine Jensen, Republican
• Charles Messick, Libertarian
— Three candidates are running for state Sen. Cheri Jahn’s seat in Senate District 20, which extends from Wheat Ridge to Lakewood, to Ken Caryl and Dakota Ridge.

Senate District 22
• Brittany Pettersen, Democrat
• Tony Sanchez, Republican
— Two candidates are vying for the Senate District 22 seat, which is being vacated by term-limited Democrat Andy Kerr.

House District 25
• Steve Szutenbach, Republican
• Lisa Cutter, Democrat
— State representatives are members of Colorado’s House of Representative and serve in the lower house of the Colorado General Assembly. The two candidates are currently vying for the House District seat, which covers Evergreen, Conifer, Coal Creek, and parts of Golden and South Jeffco. They are running to replace outgoing state Rep. Tim Leonard, R-Evergreen.

Senate District 2
• Beth “Hart” Harz, Democrat
• Dennis Hisey, Republican
— State senators are members of the Colorado Senate and serve in the upper house of the Colorado General Assembly alongside members of Colorado’s House of Representatives.
NOTE: Also on the ballot are races for secretary of state, state treasurer and attorney general.

FEDERAL OFFICES
Congressional District 1

• Diana DeGette, Democrat
• Casper Stockham, Republican
• Raymon Anthony Doane, Libertarian
• Miguel Lopez, Write-in candidate
— Four candidates are hoping to take Colorado’s 1st Congressional District seat, including Democratic incumbent Diana DeGette, who has held the seat since 1997.

BALLOT MEASURES
Town of Morrison Ballot Question 2C

Ballot question 2C asks whether an ordinance providing for the rezoning of approximately 345 acres of land known as Red Rocks Centre, which is located on the northeast corner of the intersection of Morrison Road and C-470, from planned development to commercial limited development be approved.

Jefferson County School District R-1
Ballot Issue 5A

Ballot Issue 5A is Jeffco Public Schools’ proposed $33 million mill levy override, which would go toward a variety of purposes, including increased compensation for teachers and staff — excluding central administration — increased mental health supports, updating instructional materials, and early childhood education.

Jefferson County School District R-1
Ballot Issue 5B

Ballot Issue 5B is Jeffco Public Schools’ proposed $567 million bond issue, which would go toward increase school safety and security upgrades, facilities repairs and renovations, construction of new schools and more.

Ken-Caryl Ranch Metropolitan District Ballot Issue 6G
Ballot Issue 6G is a request from the Ken-Caryl Ranch Metropolitan District to raise the district’s taxes by $1.53 million annually, beginning in mill levy year 2018 for collection in calendar year 2019, by increasing the district’s existing property tax by 8 mills.

Inter-Canyon Fire Protection
District Ballot Issue 6F

Ballot Issue 6F is Inter-Canyon Fire’s proposed mill levy override and is requesting that voters approve a property tax increase of 3 mills and also approve a provision to allow the district to annually adjust its total mill levy rate of 13.561 mills to offset revenue losses from adjustments associated with the Gallagher Amendment.

West Metro Fire Protection District
Ballot Issue 7C

Ballot Issue 7C is asking voters’ permission for the West Metro Fire Protection District to adjust its property tax mill levy to offset any revenue losses associated with a reduction of the residential assessment rate below its current rate.

STATEWIDE
Constitutional Amendments

All constitutional amendments must receive 55 percent of the vote to pass.

Amendment V
Amendment V proposes changing the Colorado Constitution to lower the minimum age qualification of a member of the Colorado General Assembly from 25 years old to 21.

Amendment Y
Amendment Y seeks to de-politicize the way that congressional district maps are drawn — essentially removing that map drawing power from the state legislature and giving it to an independent commission composed of 12 citizens who possess specific qualifications. The amendment prohibits any one political party’s control of the commission by requiring that one-third of the commissioners be unaffiliated with any political party, one third be affiliated with the state’s largest political party and one third be affiliated with the second-largest political party.

Amendment Z
The second amendment supported by Fair Maps Colorado, a group seeking to end gerrymandering that also support Amendment Y, Amendment Z calls for reforming the existing legislative reapportionment commission by “expanding the commission to 12 members and authorizing the appointment of members who possess specified qualifications,” not unlike those required in Amendment Y.

Amendment 73
A citizen-initiated amendment, Amendment 73 seeks to change the financing of P-12 public education in Colorado by raising the corporate tax rate from 4.63 percent to 6 percent, increasing income taxes on citizens whose annual income exceeds $150,000, and changing how property taxes are assessed for schools by reducing the current residential assessment rate of 7.2 percent to 7 percent and by reducing the nonresidential assessment rate from 29 percent to 24 percent in 2019.

STATUTORY PROPOSITIONS
Proposition 109

Proposition 109 requires the state to borrow up to $3.5 billion — with a maximum repayment cost of $5.2 billion over 20 years — for the construction, repair and maintenance of up to 66 specific highway and bridge projects on a priority list assembled by the Colorado Department of Transportation.

Proposition 110
Proposition 110 proposes raising state sales and use taxes from 2.9 percent to 3.52 percent for 20 years in an effort to fund transportation projects, including road construction and repairs, multimodal projects such as bicycle lanes and walking paths, and more.

Proposition 112
Proposition 112 would change the statewide minimum distance requirement for any new oil and gas development to at least 2,500 feet from any occupied structure or any other vulnerable area.