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Local News

  • SHERIFF'S CALLS

    A house divided

  • Sheriff’s Office seizes 18 horses from Morrison property

    The Jeffco Sheriff’s Office seized 18 horses from a Morrison property May 21.

    “The horses have illnesses and physical issues,” said Christine Padilla, an animal control officer with the Sheriff’s Office. “(Most of the horses) were kept in a dirt lot, and there was no grass for them to graze on.”

    Padilla also said there is a 75-foot drop on the property that isn’t fenced off.

    “The majority of the horses were in poor condition and underweight,” Padilla said. 

  • Littleton picks finalist for law firm

    The Littleton City Council has narrowed the list of law firms to serve in the vacant city attorney position from four to one. 

    The council voted 5-1 to move forward with negotiating with the law firm of Kissinger and Fellman to provide legal services to the city. Councilman Phil Cernanec voted against the resolution, and Councilman Bruce Beckman was absent. 

  • Littleton City Council ousts planning board member

    The Littleton City Council has voted to remove Scott Ranville from the city’s planning board.

    Ranville, who was removed from the board May 21 on a 6-0 vote, was appointed to the volunteer panel in April and had attended two meetings, including a postponed hearing on the proposed Broadstone development project on May 13.

  • Jeffco sheriff gets authority to prohibit openly carrying guns in county buildings

    The Jeffco county commissioners approved an ordinance Thursday that allows the sheriff to prohibit openly carrying firearms in designated county buildings despite Commissioner Don Rosier’s concern that the ordinance left too many questions unanswered.

    The ordinance, approved on a 2-1 vote with Rosier dissenting, directs the sheriff to conduct yearly vulnerability assessments of county buildings and to decide whether the open carrying of firearms should be banned.

  • Saye gives it his all

    LAKEWOOD — It was supposed to be offseason training, a getaway from the Colorado winter. Littleton’s Tucker Saye was rounding the track on his 2013 Staman’s Motorsports Suzuki 450, chasing down the second-place rider as part of the five-race Texas Winter Series. It was the last moto of the day, and he was off to a good start.

  • 4 arrested as deputies thwart robbery at South Jeffco coin store

    Four people were arrested early Thursday when Jeffco deputies thwarted a robbery at a South Jeffco coin store.

    A silent alarm at World of Coins, 7735 W. Long Drive, was triggered about 1:30 a.m. Thursday, according to the Jeffco Sheriff’s Office. When deputies arrived, they saw that the store’s front glass door had been smashed and that a silver Subaru was parked out front.

  • Littleton council decides not to charge admission at museum

    Admission fees won’t be charged at the Littleton Museum anytime soon, though the City Council still wants to continue looking for ways to raise money to support the facility.

    The council decided not to impose admission fees at the museum after hearing six fee-structure options it had requested in January. Museum director Tim Nimz suggested options that would raise anywhere from $7,500 to $157,000 yearly but warned the fees likely would reduce attendance.

  • Law requiring reporting of elderly abuse signed in Jeffco

    Colorado has made it a crime to not report suspected abuse of elderly people, and the law took effect with a signing ceremony in Jefferson County. 

    Senate Bill 111, which was signed by Gov. John Hickenlooper on May 16 at the Seniors’ Resource Center in Wheat Ridge, makes it a crime if those in professions such as home health care, law enforcement and nursing do not report suspected physical abuse of people 70 and older within 24 hours. 

  • Littleton City Council interviews four law firms

    After hearing proposals from four law firms, members of the Littleton City Council believe they may have found a solution to filling the vacant city attorney position. 

    The council has been trying to decide how it would replace former city attorney Kirsten Crawford, who resigned in February. In a review of the city's legal services, one suggestion was to outsource the work to a legal firm instead of hiring a full-time city attorney.