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Today's News

  • Morrison repeals more stringent noise ordinance

    For several months, the Morrison Police Department has actively enforced the town’s noise ordinance. So far, it’s working.

    So much so that Chief George Mumma on June 5 asked the board to repeal a more stringent noise ordinance that was enacted in March and set to go into effect last Sunday if enforcement of its current ordinance proved unsuccessful.

    The board listened and unanimously repealed the ordinance with the understanding that noise enforcement will continue.

  • News briefs

    West Metro amends 2018 budget

    West Metro Fire Rescue amended its 2018 budget during the board’s May meeting to account for unanticipated funds and to make a correction.

  • Robinson highlights infrastructure, education
  • Renovations made at Swedish SW ER

    In a day when freestanding emergency departments pop up frequently, Swedish Southwest ER remains a South Jeffco community staple.

    The emergency room, which opened 13 years ago, recently was renovated to update the facility and provide more room for patients.

    Among other things, the $2 million project included new flooring, painting and signage as well as a new triage room. Work began in September 2017 and wrapped up two weeks ago.

  • Beer garden opens a stone’s throw from Red Rocks Amphitheatre

    Nestled in a quaint cottage on a shady parcel in Morrison is a new beer garden serving solely Colorado beers.

    Since first opening its doors in April, Red Rocks Beer Garden is working to find its footing in hopes of becoming the go-to place for hikers, visitors, locals, dog lovers and concert-goers alike.

    “We wanted to be a place people would come beforehand,” owner Paul Thompson said of his business’ relationship with the famous concert venue.

  • Jeffco Sheriff’s Office’s volunteer reserves lend a helping hand

    If you spot him working security at the Jeffco courthouse, Don Spears looks just like any other Jefferson County sheriff’s deputy.

    And when it comes to training, he pretty much is. But unlike other Jeffco deputies, Spears is not paid to be there. He’s part of the Jeffco Sheriff’s Office reserve deputy program, though, visually, nothing sets him apart other than a small reserve patch on the shoulder of his dark green uniform.

  • Inter-Canyon Fire considering property tax increase

    Inter-Canyon Fire Protection District is inching closer to asking its residents for a property tax increase or to de-Gallagher-ize the district in the November election.

    The first option would increase property taxes for Inter-Canyon’s 6,000 residents. The latter would lock the district in at its current residential assessment rate of 7.2 percent and help it avoid the impact of the Gallagher Amendment.

  • Colorado primary a huge change for voters

    Your ballot for what is by almost any measure the most interesting primary election in Colorado history should have arrived in the mail recently.

    In 2018, both the Republican and Democratic parties will be choosing from four different candidates for governor on their primary ballots. It is possible, if not likely, that both parties will nominate candidates who receive support from less than half of their parties’ voters.

  • SW Plaza burglary suspect pleads guilty

    One of the men involved in an October smash-and-grab burglary at J.C. Penney Co. in Southwest Plaza pleaded guilty Monday afternoon to two felony charges.

    Lance David Segura, 19, will be sentenced June 25 for his involvement in the break-in, which caused $40,000 worth of building damage. Segura pleaded guilty to one class-4 felony burglary charge and another class-6 felony charge of possession of a weapon by a previous offender. Because Segura was on probation at the time of the offense, he is facing an aggravated sentence, which means five to 12 years in prison.

  • Parsing the silly season

    It is not bad enough that 70 percent of us are afflicted with “news fatigue,” but now we are solidly enmeshed in and totally bored with the “silly” season of politics fondly known as the primaries.

    While having a role in our election process, many would agree with me that things have gotten a bit out of hand. Certainly, the projection of campaign costs approaching $25 million should be a source of some concern.