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Opinion

  • Jeffco Schools 5A/5B helps provide security

    Editor:

    Never again in our district — not on our watch. These are words to live by when it comes to safety and security in Jeffco Schools, and one of the many  reasons I support Jeffco Schools 5A and 5B.

    The mill levy override and bond will fund important security improvements in our schools. Funds from 5A will allow Jeffco to put more campus supervisors in middle schools, and more security personnel and School Resource Officers at all school levels.

  • By Steve Posner

    Ballots were mailed out on Monday. When yours arrives, it will be the most important piece of mail in your mailbox.

    This year’s midterm election carries enormous political stakes. But the vast majority of eligible voters will likely ignore their ballots and not bother to vote. Voter turnout in the 2014 midterms was the lowest since the Census Bureau first began tracking it in 1978. And only 23.1 percent of 18- to 34-year-olds voted.

  • If you know Sal Christ, you know she’s not one to toot her own horn. She’s never been one who has wanted to be in the spotlight. But there comes a time when someone should take notice of what others have accomplished, and that’s the point of this column.

    A veteran journalist, Sal is leaving Evergreen Newspapers this week for a nine-month fellowship program with the American Political Science Association in Washington, D.C. Yes, Ms. Christ is going to Washington, and we here couldn’t be happier for her.

  • Your ballot for what is by almost any measure the most interesting primary election in Colorado history should have arrived in the mail recently.

    In 2018, both the Republican and Democratic parties will be choosing from four different candidates for governor on their primary ballots. It is possible, if not likely, that both parties will nominate candidates who receive support from less than half of their parties’ voters.

  • It is not bad enough that 70 percent of us are afflicted with “news fatigue,” but now we are solidly enmeshed in and totally bored with the “silly” season of politics fondly known as the primaries.

    While having a role in our election process, many would agree with me that things have gotten a bit out of hand. Certainly, the projection of campaign costs approaching $25 million should be a source of some concern.

  • Now that we are in a period of nearly full employment, people have many job choices. The days of taking any job you can get and hanging on for dear life are over. Managers, executives and everyday employees can choose to join an organization or not. They expect that in addition to their paycheck, they have a right to expect good treatment in the forms of recognition for good work, a reasonable work schedule and respect from managers and others. Many will ask about the values of the organization as well as its goals.

  • Last week we took a look at the circus as an appropriate analogy for the manipulation by the national media ringmasters of four rings of infotainment. Interestingly enough, there is also perhaps another similarity that merits inspection.

  • Fireworks are a freakout for furry friends
    Editor:
    Just when I was getting used to quiet nights in the Columbine area, last night I heard a couple loud firework “pops.” Sure enough, a few seconds later, my dog came downstairs, hunkered down and headed straight to the bathroom to hide.

  • Joe Webb, Chariman of the Jefferson County Republican Party

  • Jefferson County’s connections to the big news stories of recent days— troops in Afghanistan, terrorism in Barcelona, racism in Charlottesville, confrontation with North Korea— are indistinct. But with North Korea warning Sunday of “the uncontrollable phase of a nuclear war,” confrontation is back. And so is belligerence. And so is the nuclear menace. Jefferson County isn’t likely in North Korea’s crosshairs. But if the confrontation turns uncontrollable, all of us could be the losers.

  • The most important renewable resource that we can access is children. Our ability to provide education and training for future generations is the single biggest thing we can do to adequately prepare ourselves for the future.

  • Today — Thursday, Aug. 17 — is the first day of school in Jefferson County, and my wife and I know it all too well. Goodbye, sleeping in until the weekend comes.
    OK, it’s not that bad. I don’t get that much sleep as it is. But with two school-aged children — one still in elementary school and another a year away from high school (gulp!) — the next nine months will be an assortment of running around to get kids to and from where they need to be, juggling homework assignments and finding that work-life balance.

  • President Trump is no deal maker
    Editor:
    President Trump was elected largely because he is a deal maker, someone who can get things done.
    So it is surprising that there is no new health care legislation. One can try to blame the media or the Democrats, but that would be disingenuous. President Trump stressed that he could make deals with everyone.

  • Greg Dobbs

  • Linda Kirkpatrick

  • Jim Rohrer

  • I woke up Saturday morning to the news of the passing of Jim Vance. Who you may ask? Let me explain.
    Vance, for as long as I can remember, was the news anchor for NBC4, the local affiliate in Washington, D.C. The 75-year-old started at WRC-TV in 1969, two years before I was born. He was one of the first African-Americans to sit in the news anchor chair. No, he doesn’t have a nationally recognizable name like Walter Cronkite, Dan Rather or Peter Jennings, but he was a staple in Washington, D.C., television news.